2021 Research Fellows

SNAAP awards Research Fellowships to scholars who will use SNAAP data to shed light on important issues of our time. Each project is supported with an award of $5,000. Indiana University School of Education, Center for Postsecondary Research has generously funded the 2021 awards.

Non-White K‑12 Arts Educator Collaboration: Using Counternarratives as an Analysis Tool

Tiffany Bourgeois (top)
The Ohio State University

Amy Lewis (bottom)
James Madison University

This study will examine how non-white K‑12 arts teachers collaborate and take advantage of cross disciplinary opportunities. The researchers will examine data from K‑12 arts teachers that identify as non-white using a counternarrative lens, a central tenet of Critical Race Theory, to emphasize experiences commonly overlooked.

Headshots of Tiffany Bourgeois and Amy Lewis

The Intersections of Creative Access: The Impact of Race, Ethnicity and Gender on Career Development in the Visual Arts and Design

Lauren Cross
University of North Texas

This study will investigate how the educational experiences and career trajectories of women and art students of color are impacted by the intersections of institutional racism and sexism within the visual arts and design academy.

Headshot of Lauren Cross

Exploring Diversity for Arts Graduates in Leadership Roles

Marisol D’Andrea

This project will examine diversity (ethnicity, gender, and age) in arts graduates who work in management or leadership roles, both within and outside the arts.

Headshot of Marisol D’Andrea

Are We Training Arts Students to be Arts Entrepreneurs? A SNAAP Study on the Institutional Experience of Arts Students and Their Entrepreneurial Careers

David McGraw (top)

Wen Guo (bottom)
Elon University

This project will investigate three main research inquiries: What skills and experiences from postsecondary education are important for students adopting an entrepreneurial career path? Does institutional preparedness influence students’ adoption of an entrepreneurial career path? Is there a significant difference between white and non-white graduates in adopting an entrepreneurial career path?

Headshots of David McGraw & Wen Guo

Unraveling Gender and Race Bias in Fashion Design Careers 

Natalie Salvador (top)
Otis College of Art and Design

Amelia Williams (bottom)
Montana State University

This study will explore female and BIPOC career paths in the fashion industry by examining the career trajectories of designers around race and gender, analyze skills taught in postsecondary fashion education; and explore the effects of socio-cultural and gender norms on career paths in fashion design.

Headshots of Natalie Salvador & Amelia Williams

DATA SHARING

The extensive, one-of-a-kind SNAAP database is available to qualified researchers on request. Under participation agreements with SNAAP institutions, data that identifies individual institutions or individuals cannot be shared. A fee may be requested to offset the time that SNAAP analysts will need to strip the data of any identifying information and prepare the data for transmittal. Please contact info@snaaparts.org for information about accessing the SNAAP database.

CODEBOOKS

The SNAAP codebooks help institutional researchers use their data. The codebooks provide all questions, response options, and coding information represented in the survey data, including variables.